“If the goal is scale, promote theft.”

“If the goal is scale, promote theft.” If organizations that are trying to effect wide scale social change don’t open-source their successes & failures–we’ll never get to victory. All leaders of movement organizations should read this piece.

Reputation, Reputation, Reputation

The issue of how to maintain one’s online reputation is going to be a pressing one, in coming years. One country considers criminalizing slander on social networks.

Xbox One might be TV that watches you. No, like really watches. Down to your heart rate response to advertising. I wonder what a marketer would pay for that kind of data?

If Twitter’s going to turn into another company that turns our comments into data for the company to sell to advertisers–what are we getting out of the deal?

What’s Going on in the Workforce?

In the “that was quick” department, here’s a site offering freelance work to furloughed federal workers.

Ever wonder how China is so successful at censoring internet use? Chalk it up to 2 million “internet opinion analysts.” I guess they didn’t want to use Mechanical Turk?

What’s it like to take a MOOC? Somewhat unfulfilling, evidently. I bet it’ll be even better when the video editing of same becomes completely automated.

I tend to fall on the side of those who are convinced that technological change is disrupting employment faster than it’s making new jobs. Here’s an opposing view. On the other hand, rail automation replaces Australian train engineers who get paid $240K a year. And anesthesiologists fight being replaced by CRNAs, but now they’ve also got to fight machines. Not in a cool, Hugh Jackman kind of way either. Lest my Sheetmetal friends be thinking that they’re exempt, here’s a robot that can learn to weld without being programmed for a specific intersection.

In related news, the fast food industry’s fighting a hike in the minimum wage by threatening that US workers will be replaced by robots.

From Partners

The Democracy Collaborative recently put out a new paper describing some of the best practices for using anchor institutions–like hospitals or universities–to meet the needs of the low-income communities they sit near or serve.

The new Cry Wolf Project aims to debunk claims by conservative think tanks & business groups that progressive reforms hurt the economy.

Sharing, Solidarity & Sustainability

If you missed the launch of the final chapter of The Story of Stuff last week, you really ought to watch it.

Want to help map the shareability of cities in the US? Join up with this mapping venture in mid-October. And while we’re on the topic of sharing and October–check out New Economy Week.

You may think that you’re committed to sustainability–but are you “moving into a dumpster” committed? Or perhaps you want to move to an island made of recycled ocean plastic? It seems like a fitting penance for my dirty Coke Zero habit…

Maybe you should just start a community currency, instead. (Though as someone who lives in a town where the local ‘Cash’ looks like Monopoly money, take my advice–invest in graphic design.)

What if you know how to fish, but you can’t get access to a fishing hole? Ed Whitfield, a member of the US Federation of Worker Co-Ops, breaks it down in this video. In order to allow more co-ops to buy those fishing holes (could this metaphor get any more tortured?) the bank belonging to the world’s largest worker-owned coop (Mondragon) recently agreed to partner with the US’s National Cooperative Bank.

The price of car sharing may be too high to make it sustainable for short-term rentals, at least for now.

The Singularity Approaches

Any day now, we’ll be stalked in the wild by galloping robots.

“Robotics without wires or motors.” If you’ve been wondering how self-assembling machines will happen, watch these program-embedded materials turn themselves into things. Imagine if water pipes could expand or contract to meet supply or shifting weather conditions? MIT’s all up on the self-assembling–here are some cubes that build themselves, too.

Are we at peak Google Glass yet? Probably not, if we’re just now figuring out how to make computers visually recognize objects.

If you’re in the US, and you’re nostalgic for Lee Majors http://imdb.to/18JXt0T, check out this upcoming show on the Smithsonian Channel “The Incredible Bionic Man.”

Geeking Out

I don’t know if I want to brush my teeth with something that came out of a 3D printer & looks like a caterpillar–but you might.

You’ve probably already used an app to hack your body in some way–calorie counting, tracking exercise, logging sleep–but have you tracked & hacked your driving habits yet?

Final Thoughts

“Anything that you measure in public, people will strive & self-organize to improve.”

Rick Falkvinge, Swarmwise

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